Tuesday, April 25, 2006

Native Visions Film Festival: Showings

Johnny TooTall
Hank Williams First Nation
Trudell
The Gift of Diabetes
Rabbit Boss
Cowboys and Indians

Saturday, April 08, 2006

Indigenous Film Festival (Venue Format & Setup)

Normally at one of our Tribal Film Festivals we prepare. We have it now down to Mini-Film Festivals of 45 minutes of set up time with about a week of advanced notice. With larger film festivals we prepare months in advance. This explaination is for a "Mini-Film" Festival Venue Format & Setup).

We gather the resources needed for the technical portion. (LCD Projectors (we use InFocus) , Backlit Screens [a wall will do fine in a gym], Speaker units (we use a Peavey System), DVD & VCR combo Player, and flash lights.


(22 min) The Washoe Tribe Film Academy "Youth Films" will show various films created in conjunction with the American Indian Film Institute. These 6 Films depict the humor of Tribal Reservations through the childrens eyes and told through film as a story format of thier own interpretation. These mini-films dealing with Meth & Drugs, Stewart Indian School, and normal living on the Reservation just outside Lake Tahoe (less than 40 minutes away)

(15 min) "2007 Indigenous Games Introduction" By Chairman Brian Wallace. The Tahoe Baikal Association in conjunction with Lake Baikal have on ongoing relation of the Indigenous Games in Russia. These are a series of Lake Baikal photos which are integrated with our Washoe Tribal Lands showing many indigeous similarities between our two living bodies of waters. Washoe Creation story by Cristy Tom (Tribal Youth Film Academy), Dinah Pete (Speaking in Native Washoe Language), and Chairman Brian Wallace providing an introduction to the Indigenous Games.

(56 mins) “The Snowbowl Effect” which documents the Native American struggle to protect Arizona’s San Francisco Peaks from Corporate owned Ski Resorts. The Snowbowl Effect explores the controversy surrounding the recently proposed ski resort expansion and snowmaking with wastewater on the San Francisco Peaks as Native American tribal officials and spiritual leaders, Forest Service officials, and concerned citizens discuss the issues: sacred lands protection, public health concerns associated with groundbreaking studies on wastewater, economic misconceptions, threats to the environment, global warming and a small community caught in the conflict.

(90 min) “Homeland: Four Portraits of Native Action” http://www.katahdin.org/homelandclips.htm
One of the most critical but least known human rights stories in America is the savaging of Native American lands and its impact on Native peoples. Nearly all Indian nations sit on land threatened by ruinous environmental hazards - toxic waste, strip mining, oil drilling, and nuclear contamination. The realities that the tribes live with are bleak - children play near radioactive waste, rivers that tribes depend on for food are poisoned and reservations are completely surrounded by strip mines and smoke stacks spewing noxious fumes.

Sunday, March 05, 2006

Native Visions Film Festival: Showings


Native Visions Film Festival is held every year on the Washoe Tribal Resort at Meeks Bay in Lake Tahoe California. This year it will be June 23 & 24th.

Attending will be Michael Smith the Founder and President of AIFI (American Indian Film Institute). Organizing the event is Joseph Arthur (Washoe Tribe of Nevada & California - Media Specialist) and Alan Johnson (General Manager of Meeks Bay Resort).

I have a line up of films that we will be showing for that day: (getting event approval from Directors themselves)
For the Tribal Elder, I will ask both Dinah Pete & Linda Shoshoni. I still have yet to hear
from other Indian Taco Vendors, but I will put the word out again in our Washoe Communities.

- Johnny Tootall (1) Feature Film
- WashoeTribe Film Academy Films (7) Shorts
- Hank Williams First America (1)Feature Film
- Cowboys & Indians (1) Short
- Snowball Effect (1) Documentary Feature Length
- Rabbit Boss

Rabbit Boss


Rabbit Boss is a short documentary exploring an important dimension of American Indian life in the Great Basin. Every autumn, in sagebrush valleys east of the Sierra Nevada, Washoe Indians renew a connection with their natural environment. When the time is right, a leader known as the "rabbit boss" assembles a group of hunters to move through the brush, driving jackrabbits before them. As in the past, the rabbits are killed for their meat and pelts. Rabbit Boss follows the current leader, Marvin Dressler, on three rabbit drives in the basin-and-range country of the Washoe homeland. On-site footage and historic photos show how the rabbit drive has survived the twentieth century transformation of Washoe life, and excerpts from a decades-old home movie record the making of one of the last of the rabbit skin blankets.

Marvin Dressler (the Boss) is the principal narrator of the documentary, and his words are his own. Although he speaks English, his is an authentic Washoe account of the rabbit drive, the weaving of a rabbit skin blanket, and the importance of rabbits in Washoe life. In a world of social uncertainty, Rabbit Boss captures the strength of an enduring tradition. Its production was made possible in part by a grant from the Nevada Humanities Committee.

Rabbit Boss was recently chosen for screening at the 1998 American Anthropological Association Meetings in Philadelphia. It has also won awards at the New York and Columbus International Film Festivals and has been selected for screening at the following additional festivals:
21st Annual American Indian Film Festival
1997 Smithsonian American Indian Film and Video Festival
University of Montana Film Festival

"A poignant record of tenacious cultural survival and the role of a traditional leader in a modern Washoe community.... I recommend it as critical viewing for any course on Native American culture or history."
--Warren d'Azevedo, author of the "Washoe" chapter in the Smithsonian's Handbook of North American Indians

"[Rabbit Boss] would be ideal for use in the classroom, and is an important document of past Washoe customs, one that probably could not have been put together in written form."
-- Jerome Edwards, Nevada Historical Society Quarterly

"[This film] is a story of revival and cultural vitality rather than one of mere survival.... The rabbit boss was an important role in traditional times and it remains so and therefore the Washoe remain Washoe. A really fine job of filmmaking."
-- James Downs, author of Two Worlds of the Washoe

"...the tape offers a unique Washoe perspective."
-- Ed Vogel, Las Vegas Review-Journal

Rabbit Boss


Rabbit Boss is a short documentary exploring an important dimension of American Indian life in the Great Basin. Every autumn, in sagebrush valleys east of the Sierra Nevada, Washoe Indians renew a connection with their natural environment. When the time is right, a leader known as the "rabbit boss" assembles a group of hunters to move through the brush, driving jackrabbits before them. As in the past, the rabbits are killed for their meat and pelts. Rabbit Boss follows the current leader, Marvin Dressler, on three rabbit drives in the basin-and-range country of the Washoe homeland. On-site footage and historic photos show how the rabbit drive has survived the twentieth century transformation of Washoe life, and excerpts from a decades-old home movie record the making of one of the last of the rabbit skin blankets.

Marvin Dressler (the Boss) is the principal narrator of the documentary, and his words are his own. Although he speaks English, his is an authentic Washoe account of the rabbit drive, the weaving of a rabbit skin blanket, and the importance of rabbits in Washoe life. In a world of social uncertainty, Rabbit Boss captures the strength of an enduring tradition. Its production was made possible in part by a grant from the Nevada Humanities Committee.

Rabbit Boss was recently chosen for screening at the 1998 American Anthropological Association Meetings in Philadelphia. It has also won awards at the New York and Columbus International Film Festivals and has been selected for screening at the following additional festivals:
21st Annual American Indian Film Festival
1997 Smithsonian American Indian Film and Video Festival
University of Montana Film Festival

"A poignant record of tenacious cultural survival and the role of a traditional leader in a modern Washoe community.... I recommend it as critical viewing for any course on Native American culture or history."
--Warren d'Azevedo, author of the "Washoe" chapter in the Smithsonian's Handbook of North American Indians

"[Rabbit Boss] would be ideal for use in the classroom, and is an important document of past Washoe customs, one that probably could not have been put together in written form."
-- Jerome Edwards, Nevada Historical Society Quarterly

"[This film] is a story of revival and cultural vitality rather than one of mere survival.... The rabbit boss was an important role in traditional times and it remains so and therefore the Washoe remain Washoe. A really fine job of filmmaking."
-- James Downs, author of Two Worlds of the Washoe

"...the tape offers a unique Washoe perspective."
-- Ed Vogel, Las Vegas Review-Journal

Saturday, March 04, 2006

Native Visions Film Festival


Native Visions Film Festival is held every year on the Washoe Tribal Resort at Meeks Bay in Lake Tahoe California. This year it will be June 23 & 24th.

Attending will be Michael Smith the Founder and President of AIFI (American Indian Film Institute). Organizing the event is Joseph Arthur (Washoe Tribe of Nevada & California - Media Specialist) and Alan Johnson (General Manager of Meeks Bay Resort).